ladder rung poem

written for a poetry tow truck prompt

TEASE

Beside flat black roads, the breeze strolls, fluttering.
The plastic bags flip; the puddles wave.  Flirting with trash and
lake, with cloud grass and petals, the air is dancing
beneath phone wires, the moon, the glass buildingsIn
the light, out of sight, back it comes, spinning up music, on the
trees and beer cans.  Beside the flat road, strolls the breeze.

__________

This was good exercise for me.  By that I mean, hard work.  The constraints on line endings and beginnings pretty tight.  Like working within a form.  If I do this again, I’ll pick lines without so much “the” and “and” to end lines.

Poetry Tow Truck 9: Beginnings and Endings

choose a rhyming couplet from any poem by another author. (Or one of your own – you never know how you might inspire yourself!)
Write the first line vertically down the left margin and the second line vertically down the far right margin.
Now draft a poem completely within the parameters of these beginning and ending words for each line.  You will end up with a block of text that functions as a poem. And, since the rhyming lines were your base, you will have a built-in attention to sound.

 

THE DAFFODILS; OR, I WANDERED LONELY AS A CLOUD
by: William Wordsworth

WANDERED lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o’er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Create-a-Holiday Day

for a prompt from

ButterSideUP Day

It’s ButterSideUP Day  make some noise
++++++ make rattles and clangs
++++++ whoooooo-eeeeeee!
It’s ButterSideUP Day  sing an upside song
++++++ sing the Butterside anthem, and-a-one, two
+++++++++++++hey, hey, hey
+++++++++++++mi mi mi mimimimimimimiiiii
+++++++++++++hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
Fill the streets with bells and cymbals,
paper combs, and pennywhistles; sail around the world.  Take a ride, boys:

+++++++++++++ohm mama ohm mama ohm mama ohm
+++++++++++++ohm mama ohm mama ohm mama ohm

Paint the world in polka dots and leaning stripes
sunny yellow orange and black and robins’ egg

Feast on silly messy food
paint your face with cheetos
and sugar powders, pink and blacklight blues

Dance if you can; if you can’t dance,
stomp; if you can’t stomp, whistle, hoot or
clap, snap, thump; and think ButterSideUP.

Every body must get
Butter Side Up.

____________

Well.  I’m not real thrilled with the poem.  Some bits tickle me, though, and I like the name.  Took for-ever to come up with anything (that I could consider PG)

MONDAY PROMPT / February 21

This week is your chance to create your own festival, holiday or annual celebration, or to write the anti- of any of them — real or imagined — as a poem.

a few of my discards:

Chicken or egg day
Out of your mind day
Dissatisfaction day
Blame it on Alpha Centauri
frosting day, crusty day
time travel, brainstorm, revise your life day
Luck of the draw day

Luck of the draw day

+++++ buy a ticket
+++++ for a dollar: luck of the draw
the machine may
eat your money: luck of the draw
+++++ scratch off one of
+++++ seven numbers: luck of the draw
no one knows what’s
in your future: luck of the draw

Tin Pan Alley

written for a prompt from

Throw it Away
(Abbey Lincoln)

Say that
+++++ the alley is stretched out,
+++++resting its head up against my back gate,
+++++with its left hand dipping toward my garbage cans.
Then
+++++down the way of its spindly shanks,
+++++past its pockets, spilling old cash register receipts
+++++and fake credit cards useful for cleaning the dogshit out of
+++++the grooves of shoes, or, bent, loosening a phillips head
+++++and past that knobby knee poking through
+++++into a back yard with no fence
+++++to where it is just about to touch the sidewalk
+++++on the east side of North Fourteenth Street,
Its toe
+++++is sticking up white as a dirty sock,
+++++wiggling in the wind like a knot-eared trash bag.

_________

For this week’s prompt, take the title of a song (whether you enjoy the song or not is optional) and make that the title of your poem; then, write the poem.